While many of us have been engrossed in the Instagram lives of our co-workers and peers, a backlash among young people has been quietly boiling. One 2017 survey of British schoolchildren found that 63% would be happy if social media had never been invented. Another survey of 9,000 internet users from the research firm Ampere Analysis found that people aged 18-24 had significantly changed their attitudes towards social media in the past two years. Whereas 66% of this demographic agreed with the statement “social media is important to me” in 2016, only 57% make this claim in 2018. As young people increasingly reject social media, older generations increasingly embrace it: among the 45-plus age bracket, the proportion who value social media has increased from 23% to 28% in the past year, according to Ampere’s data.
Do you have a great sense of style? Are your friends always enquiring where you purchased your latest pair of heels from? Why not make a business out of your hobby? Create a business account on Instagram and start posting beautiful pictures of your latest purchases. You can buy fashion items in bulk and sell them online and earn big bucks by doing what you love.
Some employers examine job applicants' social media profiles as part of the hiring assessment. This issue raises many ethical questions that some consider an employer's right and others consider discrimination. Many Western European countries have already implemented laws that restrict the regulation of social media in the workplace. States including Arkansas, California, Colorado, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin have passed legislation that protects potential employees and current employees from employers that demand them to give forth their username or password for a social media account.[60] Use of social media by young people has caused significant problems for some applicants who are active on social media when they try to enter the job market. A survey of 17,000 young people in six countries in 2013 found that 1 in 10 people aged 16 to 34 have been rejected for a job because of online comments they made on social media websites.[61]
Social media has a range of uses in political processes and activities. Social media have been championed as allowing anyone with an Internet connection to become a content creator[50] and empowering their users.[51] The role of social media in democratizing media participation, which proponents herald as ushering in a new era of participatory democracy, with all users able to contribute news and comments, may fall short of the ideals. Online media audience members are largely passive consumers, while content creation is dominated by a small number of users who post comments and write new content.[52]:78
Teenagers not ready to quit entirely are stepping back for a while. Dr Amanda Lenhart, who researches young people’s online lives, conducted a survey of US teenagers, asking them about taking time off social media. “We found that 58% of teenagers said they had taken at least one break from at least one social media platform. The most common reason? It was getting in the way of schoolwork or jobs, with more than a third of respondents citing this as their primary reason for leaving social media. Other reasons included feeling tired of the conflict or drama they could see unfolding among their peer group online, and feeling oppressed too by the constant firehose of information.”
Hi Maina, I have checked the social sites recommended by you. May be itis important to update on your article that Delicious no longer accepts bookmarks as it is now bought by Pinboard. Most of these social sites are being bought off and may discontinue their programs. May be you can even dedicate a new post for that. Otherwise, great piece of work there.
This is a social bookmarking web service for discovering, storing and sharing web bookmarks. The site was founded by Peter Gadjokov and Joshua Schachter in 2003 and acquired in 2005 by Yahoo. By the end of 2008, Delicious claimed that it had bookmarked 180 million URLs and acquired more than 5.3 million users. The service was later sold to AVOS Systems in April 2011 who later sold it to Science Inc. In January this year, Delicious Media said that it had acquired the service.
Influencers can also make money by hosting events or doing  store appearances. Brands can team up with influencers with similar audiences to draw more attention to an event or new product launch. A great example of this, Mecca Maxima's event/festival Mecca Land. Mecca invited Australian fashion and beauty influencers including Shani Grimmond, Isabella Fiori and Sammy Robinson to host meet & greets and attend the event. Influencers tend to have great connections with their following and can build additional hype around events. 
Facebook jumped by 100 million monthly active users from 2.13 billion in December 2017 to 2.23 billion as of June 30, 2018. The rate of growth seems to continue at 15 million active users per month. So, by the end of the year we should see 2.35 billion Facebook monthly active users. Here’s the post where Zuckerberg announced the news about reaching the 2 billion milestone:
On the same note, influencers can monetize personal blogs and websites to collaborate and create branded content. Blogs are great because they are in-depth and allow influencers to share more detailed information with their community than is possible over social media, such as detailed product reviews. Not only does blogging help influencers make money from their creative, content writing, photography and distribution platforms, it also benefits brands with click-through links that take consumers directly to products and services, getting them closer to a conversion than a social media post.
You can increase your income simply by using social media to take your current career to the next level. Obviously LinkedIn is a place to network and find job opportunities, but other social networks can achieve similar results. If a business is more casual, try friending your dream employer on Facebook. If you’re an expert on some topic, create a Twitter account to expound on that topic. There really isn’t a career that wouldn’t benefit at least a little from a social media presence.
Courts do not always admit social media evidence, in part because screenshots can be faked or tampered with.[78] Judges are taking emojis into account to assess statements made on social media; in one Michigan case where a person alleged that another person had defamed them in an online comment, the judge disagreed, noting that there was an emoji after the comment which indicated that it was a joke.[79] In a 2014 case in Ontario against a police officer regarding alleged assault of a protester during the G20 summit, the court rejected the Crown's application to use a digital photo of the protest that was anonymously posted online, because there was no metadata proving when the photo was taken and it could have been digitally altered.[80]
Mobile social media refer to the use of social media on mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet computers. Mobile social media are a useful application of mobile marketing because the creation, exchange, and circulation of user-generated content can assist companies with marketing research, communication, and relationship development.[24] Mobile social media differ from others because they incorporate the current location of the user (location-sensitivity) or the time delay between sending and receiving messages (time-sensitivity). According to Andreas Kaplan, mobile social media applications can be differentiated among four types:[24]
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