Perhaps the best feature about LinkedIn is the fact that you can post any recommendations from your previous customers or colleagues about your business right to your LinkedIn business site (and we all know just how important testimonials and third party endorsements are!) LinkedIn gives you the chance to really build up your brand in a community that is quite similar to you. As LinkedIn is more about businesses connecting with other businesses, you’ll be among more like-minded people – and you may be able to pick their brains for more marketing ideas.
The importance of social media to web marketing can't be overstated. To quote a few statistics from our Beginner's Guide to Social Media, 72% of online adults use social networking sites, and YouTube now reaches more U.S. adults aged 18-34 than any cable network. With that kind of traffic, it's no wonder marketers now use these networks to interact with their customers. Google searches for 'social media' have seen a steady rise since early 2009, and data from this year's industry survey tell a similar story. Whether you've been in on the game from the very beginning or are just starting to wonder how social tools can apply to your own professional life, the resources on this page can help take you to the next level.
Use a service like Flickr to get people acquainted with your work, offering photos they can use on their website for free under the Creative Commons license. Once you’ve built up a following, join another stock photography site like Shutterstock or iStockphoto where users will pay for the opportunity to use your pictures on their blogs. You can make up to $120 off of one paid download of your photo. Even if you get compensated at a lower level, the money can really add up if you take a lot of quality photographs.
Efforts to combat selective exposure in social media may also cause an increase in political polarization. [125] A study examining Twitter activity conducted by Bail et. al paid Democrat and Republican participants to follow Twitter handles whose content was different from their political beliefs (Republicans received liberal content and Democrats received conservative content) over a six week period. [125] At the end of the study, both Democrat and Republican participants were found to have increased political polarization in favor of their own parties, though only Republican participants had an increase that was statistically significant. [125]
Checking updates on friends' activities on social media is associated with the "fear of missing out" (FOMO), the "pervasive apprehension that others might be having rewarding experiences from which one is absent".[100] FOMO is a social anxiety[101] characterized by "a desire to stay continually connected with what others are doing".[102] It has negative influences on people's psychological health and well-being because it could contribute to negative mood and depressed feelings.[103]
You can buy almost anything on Amazon, which means you can earn a commission off of almost any product if you’re an Amazon Affiliate. After signing up for the affiliate program you can give readers of your blog, Twitter feed, etc. special links to Amazon products. If they click on the link and buy that product or anything else on the site during that visit, you receive a small commission that can really add up over time. Pickmyshaver.com, which reviews shaving devices with links to the Amazon listings, is a prime example of a successful affiliate website. It sold for over $60,000 to Flippa just eight months after it debuted. Your chances of reaping similar rewards are reasonably good if your reviews attract a lot of attention, so write them well and and convincingly so they’ll read the review and then buy the product.
Personal user accounts: If a site allows visitors to create their own accounts that they can log into, then that's a good first sign it might be used for some kind of user-based interaction — perhaps social interaction. Although it's possible to share information or interact with others online anonymously, having to create some kind of user account first is more of a common, standard thing.

According to the Pew Research Center, a majority of Americans at least occasionally receive news from social media. [123] Because of algorithms on social media which filter and display news content which are likely to match their users’ political preferences, a potential impact of receiving news from social media includes an increase in political polarization due to selective exposure. [124] Political polarization refers to when an individual's stance on a topic is more likely to be strictly defined by their identification with a specific political party or ideology than on other factors. Selective exposure occurs when an individual favors information which supports their beliefs and avoids information which conflicts with their beliefs. A study by Hayat and Samuel-Azran conducted during the 2016 U.S. presidential election observed an “echo chamber” effect of selective exposure among 27,811 Twitter users following the content of cable news shows. [124] The Twitter users observed in the study were found to have little interaction with users and content whose beliefs were different from their own, possibly heightening polarization effects. [124]
The idea that social media are defined simply by their ability to bring people together has been seen as too broad, as this would suggest that fundamentally different technologies like the telegraph and telephone are also social media.[18] The terminology is unclear, with some early researchers referring to social media as social networks or social networking services in the mid 2000s.[4] A more recent paper from 2015[2] reviewed the prominent literature in the area and identified four common features unique to then-current social media services:
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