Pinterest is a perfect platform for selling products. As a virtual pin-board, the social media service is commonly used by potential customers to “pin” items of interest that they might buy later. If you created a product or are in charge of marketing one, throw some photos of it on Pinterest to shine a spotlight on it. Look at great examples of companies that utilize Pinterest to its fullest potential like TODAY, Whole Foods Market and the Travel Channel here. If you can land a freelance job doing something similar you can hit it pretty big, but you probably need the right experience to be in the running. However, small businesses also want to promote on Pinterest, and they’re more likely to hire based on enthusiasm and a go-getter attitude, so maybe start making some cold calls and emails.
My name is Jamie Spencer and I have spent the past 5 years building money making blogs. After growing tired of the 9-5, commuting and never seeing my family I decided that I wanted to make some changes and launched my first blog. Since then I have launched lots of successful niche blogs and after selling my survivalist blog I decided to teach other people how to do the same.
But the money making potential doesn’t stop there. There are now sites that work in conjunction with Facebook to help you make money. The “My Merch Store” app through Zazzle is one of those sites. Zazzle will allow you to create and design any product on their site, free of charge. Then, you can pop on to your Facebook and sell it. This will work for anyone who has a design background or who may want to sell products made by other artists, or you can try out Cafe Press and sell things through their online store.
GeoCities was one of the Internet's earliest social networking websites, appearing in November 1994, followed by Classmates in December 1995, Six Degrees in May 1997, Open Diary in October 1998, LiveJournal in April 1999, Ryze in October 2001, Friendster in March 2002, LinkedIn in May 2003, hi5 in June 2003, MySpace in August 2003, Orkut in January 2004, Facebook in February 2004, Yahoo! 360° in March 2005, Bebo in July 2005, Twitter in July 2006, Tumblr in February 2007, and Google+ in July 2011.[12][13][14] As operating systems with a graphical user interface, such as Windows 95 and Mac OS begin to emerge and gain popularity, this created an environment that allows for early social media platforms to thrive and exist.[15][16]
Usenet, which arrived in 1979, was beat by a precursor of the electronic bulletin board system (BBS) known as Community Memory in 1973. True electronic bulletin board systems arrived with the Computer Bulletin Board System in Chicago, which first came online on 16 February 1978. Before long, most major cities had more than one BBS running on TRS-80, Apple II, Atari, IBM PC, Commodore 64, Sinclair, and similar personal computers. The IBM PC was introduced in 1981, and subsequent models of both Mac computers and PCs were used throughout the 1980s. Multiple modems, followed by specialized telecommunication hardware, allowed many users to be online simultaneously. Compuserve, Prodigy and AOL were three of the largest BBS companies and were the first to migrate to the Internet in the 1990s. Between the mid-1980s and the mid-1990s, BBSes numbered in the tens of thousands in North America alone.[11] Message forums (a specific structure of social media) arose with the BBS phenomenon throughout the 1980s and early 1990s. When the Internet proliferated in the mid-1990s, message forums migrated online, becoming Internet forums, primarily due to cheaper per-person access as well as the ability to handle far more people simultaneously than telco modem banks.
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