Also, sooo much of social media is being used for political propagandizing & pushing political interests – especially on fb – that it’s turned me off, temporarily. Is there a vehicle on these platforms that allows one to only get notifications on specific topics, say if I was to use it for biz marketing, only seeing those posts but have the ability to pull up ALL other posts, if want to? Lastly, can the comment section come first before having to scroll down on all 90 odd comments -i. e. is there a way to ‘fast forward’ thru them when one wishes to just make a comment?
But quitting social media can create new anxieties. “Our research shows that the biggest fear of quitting or pausing social media is missing out,” Bielby says. Some are more sanguine than others. “Do I miss out on stuff?” Morgan asks. “Yeah, of course. People find it hard to keep in contact with me. They say: ‘It would be easier if you had this or that.’ But I don’t think it’s that hard to type in my number and send a text. You’re just not willing to do it.”
Maybe you've always made jewelry or art on the side and have wondered how to drum up interest and attention. According to Entrepreneur, this is now easier than ever, thanks to social media. Simply create a social media page that places an emphasis on visual media - think Pinterest, Instagram and even Facebook. Post photos as often as possible and share the images with as many people as you can. The source noted that all images should contain links to online sites where people can purchase your products, such as Amazon, eBay and Etsy.
If you have a blog or website, you can promote it. And if you do affiliate marketing, you can promote that on Facebook too. If you are able to write your blog posts or descriptions to your affiliate marketing landing pages in such a way that you inspire the reader to go and visit your site, then you’ve well on your way to making good money. Remember to always write about what’s in it for the reader (i.e. 20% off such-and-such a product or “Want to know how to get a FREE IPAD2?”).
The digital divide is a measure of disparity in the level of access to technology between households, socioeconomic levels or other demographic categories.[114][115] People who are homeless, living in poverty, elderly people and those living in rural or remote communities may have little or no access to computers and the Internet; in contrast, middle class and upper-class people in urban areas have very high rates of computer and Internet access. Other models argue that within a modern information society, some individuals produce Internet content while others only consume it,[116][117] which could be a result of disparities in the education system where only some teachers integrate technology into the classroom and teach critical thinking.[118] While social media has differences among age groups, a 2010 study in the United States found no racial divide.[119] Some zero-rating programs offer subsidized data access to certain websites on low-cost plans. Critics say that this is an anti-competitive program that undermines net neutrality and creates a "walled garden"[120] for platforms like Facebook Zero. A 2015 study found that 65% of Nigerians, 61% of Indonesians, and 58% of Indians agree with the statement that "Facebook is the Internet" compared with only 5% in the US.[121]
Social media personalities have been employed by marketers to promote products online. Research shows that digital endorsements seem to be successfully targeting social media users,[84] especially younger consumers who have grown up in the digital age.[85] Celebrities with large social media followings, such as Kylie Jenner, regularly endorse products to their followers on their social media pages.[86] In 2013, the United Kingdom Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) began to advise celebrities and sports stars to make it clear if they had been paid to tweet about a product or service by using the hashtag #spon or #ad within tweets containing endorsements.

Capitalizing upon human curiosity is an ingenious idea that would lead to the creation and launch of Quora in June, 2009. The website, co-founded by two former Facebook employees, Charlie Cheever and Adam D’Angelo now claims that it received more than 80 million monthly unique visitors, with half of them coming from the U.S. So far, the question-and-answer website has managed to raise $141 in venture capital funds and while it doesn’t look ready to go public yet, it’s definitely a company to watch.
Founded more than a decade ago (November 2004), Digg is a news aggregator with a curated front page that selects stories specifically for the Internet audience, The topics vary widely from trending political issues to science to viral Internet issues and anything in between. Digg supports sharing of content to other social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. In 2015, the company claimed that it had about 11 million active monthly users.
The YouTube Partner program enables popular YouTube vloggers to make money via paid advertising, Lifehack explained. The advertisements are usually placed before the video you post and you'll get a cut of the proceedings. Success in this area is, as outlined above, contingent on your number of followers and the amount of hits you get per day. If you only have a few subscribers, then you won't make any substantial money. If, however, you are able to build a large and loyal following, this can be an effective way to make some extra cash. Indeed, there are some YouTube stars who have become so successful that it's now their primary form of income.
WhatsApp Messenger is a cross-platform instant messaging client for smartphones, PCs and tablets. The app relies on the Internet to send images, texts, documents, audio and video messages to other users that have the app installed on their devices. Launched in January 2010, WhatsApp Inc. was acquired by Facebook on February 19, 2004, for about $19.3 billion. Today, more than 1 billion people use the service to communicate with their friends, loved ones and even customers.

You can buy almost anything on Amazon, which means you can earn a commission off of almost any product if you’re an Amazon Affiliate. After signing up for the affiliate program you can give readers of your blog, Twitter feed, etc. special links to Amazon products. If they click on the link and buy that product or anything else on the site during that visit, you receive a small commission that can really add up over time. Pickmyshaver.com, which reviews shaving devices with links to the Amazon listings, is a prime example of a successful affiliate website. It sold for over $60,000 to Flippa just eight months after it debuted. Your chances of reaping similar rewards are reasonably good if your reviews attract a lot of attention, so write them well and and convincingly so they’ll read the review and then buy the product.


To get the most out of social media, make the relationships you build with it your end goal. That might sound a bit utopian for anyone who is grounded in more traditional and tangible business measurement and metrics, but take a step back from the bottom-line, ROI-seeking aspect to look at the big picture for a minute. The relationships built with customers are the foundations upon which other aspects of your business can and will flourish.

Ether is an interesting way to make money on Facebook. This website will allow you to add an app to Facebook and you can then give advice to people over the phone. If you’re good at giving advice, you can make some money. While this probably isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, if you’re into music, check out MusicBlaster. You can create a music store right on Facebook and then sell music from BlastMyMusic. For every song sold, you make 5%.
Next, instead of spamming links on Twitter and hoping for the best, keep in mind that the most honest and effective way of promoting affiliate products is through reviews. If you personally use a product and like it, and know that your followers serve to benefit from it, then write a long-form review on your blog, and share why you like the product. Don't be afraid to talk about what you like and don't like about it. You can even use video if that's more your style.
Social media may have been influenced by the 1840s introduction of the telegraph in the US, which connected the country.[10] ARPANET, which first came online in 1967, had by the late 1970s developed a rich cultural exchange of non-government/business ideas and communication, as clearly evidenced by ARPANET#Rules and etiquette's "A 1982 handbook on computing at MIT's AI Lab stated regarding network etiquette," and fully met the current definition of the term "social media" found in this article. The PLATO system launched in 1960, which was developed at the University of Illinois and subsequently commercially marketed by Control Data Corporation, offered early forms of social media with 1973-era innovations such as Notes, PLATO's message-forum application; TERM-talk, its instant-messaging feature; Talkomatic, perhaps the first online chat room; News Report, a crowd-sourced online newspaper and blog; and Access Lists, enabling the owner of a notesfile or other application to limit access to a certain set of users, for example, only friends, classmates, or co-workers. Tom Truscott and Jim Ellis conceived the idea of Usenet in 1979 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University, and it was established in 1980.
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